Brain modularity in arthropods: Individual neurons that support "what" but not "where" memories

 

Autores
<div class="autor_fcen" id="8423">Sztarker, J.</div>; <div class="autor_fcen" id="8590">Tomsic, D.</div>
Tipo de recurso
artículo
Estado
Versión publicada
Año de publicación
2011
País
Argentina
Institución
Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales
Repositorio
Biblioteca Digital (UBA-FCEN)
Descripción
Experiments with insects and crabs have demonstrated their remarkable capacity to learn and memorize complex visual features (Giurfa et al., 2001; Pedreira and Maldonado, 2003; Chittka and Niven, 2009). Such abilities are thought to require modular brain processing similar to that occurring in vertebrates (Menzel and Giurfa, 2001). Yet, physiological evidence for this type of functioning in the small brains of arthropods is still scarce (Liu et al., 1999, 2006; Menzel and Giurfa, 2001). In the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus, the learning rate as well as the long-term memory of a visual stimulus has been found to be reflected in the performance of identified lobula giant neurons (LGs) (Tomsic et al., 2003). The memory can only be evoked in the training context, indicating that animals store two components of the learned experience, one related to the visual stimulus and one related to the visual context (Tomsic et al., 1998; Hermitte et al., 1999). By performing intracellular recordings in the intact animal, we show that the ability of crabs to generalize the learned stimulus into new space positions and to distinguish it from a similar but unlearned stimulus, two of the main attributes of stimulus memory, is reflected by the performance of the LGs. Conversely, we found that LGs do not support the visual context memory component. Our results provide physiological evidence that the memory traces regarding "what" and "where" are stored separately in the arthropod brain. © 2011 the authors.
Idioma
inglés
OAI Identifier
snrd:HASHc8b4fd35d1953e8d6f76b1
Enlace del recurso
http://digital.bl.fcen.uba.ar/Download/paper/paper_02706474_v31_n22_p8175_Sztarker.pdf
Nivel de acceso
Acceso abierto
Materia
animal behavior
animal experiment
article
brain function
controlled study
crab
learning
long term memory
male
memory consolidation
nerve cell network
neuromodulation
neurotransmission
nonhuman
priority journal
stimulus response
task performance
visual stimulation
Action Potentials
Animals
Brachyura
Generalization, Stimulus
Learning
Male
Memory
Neurons
Photic Stimulation